How To Sharpen Your Butcher Knives

5 Inch Forschner-Victorinox Boning Knife
The Forschner 5 Inch Boning Knife is the BEST knife to use for the beginning Meatcutter!  And it's also a GREAT Knife for the Experienced Meatcutter !

8 Inch Forschner-Victorinox Breaking Knife
Forschner-Victorinox 8 Inch Breaking Knife.

 6 Inch Forschner-Victorinox Skinning Knife
6 Inch Skinning Knife.

10 Inch Polished Cut Granton Steel

 3 1/4 Inch Forschner-Victorinox Paring Knife

Norton Knife Sharpening Stone

Atlanta SharpTech 25 Inch Meat Handsaw

Kitchener 12 Inch Meat Handsaw

Mundial 18 Inch Magnetic Knife Rack

 Forschner-Victorinox 10 Inch Regular Cut Steel

Polar Bear Cut-Resistant Gloves
Video Clip Demonstrating How These Gloves Work!

Ansell Cut Resistant Gloves
Video Clip Demonstrating How These Gloves Work!

Atlanta SharpTech 25 Inch Meat Handsaw Replacement Blades

Kitchener 12 Inch Meat Handsaw Replacement Blades

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There are few tools more dangerous than a dull knife! It'll slide when you want it to cut, and it'll cut when it stops sliding--usually when it hits your hand. Ask ten different people how they sharpen their knives, however, and you may get ten different answers. Not only that, but each of these ten methods are all sworn to be the best by ten venerable trail guides from ten mountain towns (who've all been sharpening knives since they were knee-high to a carpenter ant and don't you forget it buddy). What's a poor soul with a dull knife to do? You can start with this tutorial, which will lead you out of the tangled thicket of knife-sharpening opinions. 

DO NOT Wash Your Boning (Butcher) Knife in the Dishwasher

Choose your stone

First, there's the question of whether or not to use a liquid on the sharpening stone. A fiery debate rages on this issue, and you'd better figure out which side you're on, so you're not mistaken for the enemy and accidentally shot. Some stones are marketed as specifically for wet and dry uses, so keep the following points in mind as you shop around. 

  • One school of thought insists that using oil, water or saliva helps "float" the tiny metal shavings away from the stone when the blade is being sharpened. 

 

  • The other camp demands that using any type of liquid just clogs up the pores of the stone (which ruins the stone forever) and only polishes the blade, rather than grinding it. 

The method below works with both dry and wet stones. 

 

Recreate the basic edge


If you were to peer at the point of a nicely sharpened, multi-purpose knife blade, it would look something like Figure 1. You'll notice that the blade is actually beveled toClose-up diagram of a knife blade with its' bevel. form the final edge, but you won't create that bevel just yet. First, you'll form the basic edge, which is a little simpler in shape, as we see in Figure 1A

One of the key points of knife-sharpening is maintaining constant angles between the blade and the stone. Basic knife edge.
There are two: the angle between the blade and the edge of the stone, and between the blade and the
surface of the stone. 

 

Place your flat, medium-grit stone on the
table in front of you.  Lay the blade flat on
 the stone at a 45 degree angle, as shown 
 in Figure 2. This 45 degree angle is the
 first of two angles. 

  Lay the blade flat on the stone at a 45 degree angles.

Grasp the knife by the handle. With your index finger along the back of the blade, raise the blade off the surface of the stone at a 20 degree angle, as shown in Figure 3. This is the second angle. 

With your index finger along the back of the blade, raise the blade off the surface of the stone at a 20 degree angle.
 
Keeping the edge of the blade in contact with the stone, firmly and carefully draw the knife towards you. This action will grind the blade from hilt to point. Maintain the 45 degree angle, and the angle that you've raised the blade off the stone. 


Apply medium to light pressure as you're drawing the edge across the stone. (For the sake of comparison, zero pressure would have the knife blade resting on the stone without you touching it.) Apply a little pressure or a bit more, depending on how old the knife is, how many times you've sharpened it, and the current condition of the edge. A very dull edge will require more pressure.

Turn the knife over, and repeat the process. If you keep the knife in the same hand, you'll be pushing the blade away from you this time. It's important to maintain the same angles on both sides of the blade. Go slowly and alternate strokes on the stone until each side of the blade has been stroked several times. A very dull knife will need a few more strokes than a better kept one. 


Create the final bevel

Now that you have a basic edge on the blade, it's a time to create the final bevel. This will strengthen the edge, so that it stays sharp longer and is less prone to be damaged by everyday use. You'll create the bevel simply by repeating Step 1, with two modifications: use a fine-grit stone, and raise the blade a bit higher off the stone (the second angle) when you draw it across. 


Place your flat, fine-grit stone on the table in front of you, and lay the blade flat on the stone at a 45 degree angle, as you did before. 


Grasp the knife by the handle. With your index finger along the back of the blade, raise the blade off the surface of the stone at a slightly greater angle than before--maybe 25 to 30 degrees. See Figure 4. 

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Keeping the edge of the blade in contact with the stone, firmly and carefully draw the knife towards you. This action will grind the blade from hilt to point. Hold the 45 degree angle, and the angle that you've raised the blade off the stone, as constant as possible. Again, apply medium to light pressure as you're drawing the edge across the stone. 
 

 

With your index finger along the back of the blade, raise the blade off the surface of the stone at a slightly greater angle than before--maybe 25 to 30 degrees.


Turn the knife over, and repeat the process. Alternate strokes again until each side of the blade has been across the stone several times--about five strokes for each side should suffice. The pressure that you apply while drawing the blade across the stone should get progressively lighter with each stroke. 


At this point you should have a pretty sharp knife. You can test it by holding a piece of paper vertically, and drawing the blade across the edge and down. A sharp knife will cut the paper. 

Why shouldn't  I wash my knives in the dishwasher?

For many reasons: The sharp edges can do damage to the rubber coating of the dishwasher baskets, eventually allowing the metal underneath to rust. Other items in the dishwasher can strike the knife edge, damaging the knife and/or the other item. If left in the dishwasher, food stuck on the blade can cause damage and pitting. Plastic handles may be discolored by detergents, and wooden ones are damaged by soaking. Hot and cold cycles may change the temper of the steel, causing brittleness.

And it's best NOT to store your Quality Forschner-Victorinox Butcher Knives in your Silverware drawer.

A knife holder (Butcher Block Countertop Style or Magnetic Knife Holder) is the BEST way to keep your Butcher Knives Sharp and Safe!

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We NOW offer a better steel.  The Forschner-Victorinox 12 Inch Regular Cut Steel!

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Razor Edge Sharpening Book from Amazon.com

Universally recognized as "The Bible of The Cutting Edge", this book belongs in the library of anyone who is serious about sharpening. Written by Guinness world record holder John Juranitch, it contains all the knowledge and insights gained during his more than 40 years in the sharpening industry. The 145 page book is crammed with photos, illustrations and cutting edge secrets you won't find anywhere else. Its 14 chapters cover topics like how to choose a knife, sharpening theories and applications, steeling, using a hone and much, much more. You'll get answers to the most asked questions. You'll learn the truth about common myths like why you should never use oil on a hone. And you'll get the insights necessary to put a great edge on knives, axes, fish hooks, arrowheads, chain saws and other tools. It's a history, a handbook, a reference manual that is the simplest, most complete way to give yourself a razor edge on sharpening.

Last Updated:  Thursday, August 09, 2012 01:06 PM